Coco Reviewed by Jon E Clist

The Premise
Despite his family's baffling generations-old ban on music, Miguel dreams of becoming an accomplished musician like his idol, Ernesto de la Cruz. Desperate to prove his talent, Miguel finds himself in the stunning and colorful Land of the Dead following a mysterious chain of events. Along the way, he meets charming trickster Hector, and together, they set off on an extraordinary journey to unlock the real story behind Miguel's family history.

The Review
Disney Pixar have really got a pretty solid track record when it comes to amazing family friendly films. Yes, they always make films with some form of moral conundrum that we can then use to discuss this sort of thing with our kids. I think that Inside Out handles the idea of mental illness and the general thoughts on psychology in a brilliant manner. While the Toy Story films deal with friendships, accepting differences and a boy’s journey to manhood. Coco is no different in that respect. Another out of the park smash hit for animation that is something really amazing to visually take in. The colours, the characters and even the music will tantalize the senses and from that point of view it is quite the piece of big screen entertainment. In Coco, The Land of the Dead was inspired by the Mexican city of Guanajuato, which is known for its colorful houses on the hillsides that look almost stacked like in the movie.

In Brazil, the title name was changed to "Viva", for the original title "Coco" could easily be mistaken by the Portuguese word "cocô", which translates to the curse word "sh*t".

The storyline is one that I really enjoyed. For example, I was not all that aware of the beliefs around the day of the dead and the strong connection to family that exists within it. It was fun to find these things out a little along the way while seeing yet another Pixar film expound on the importance of family regardless of what family looks like. Understanding that there is generally more to all stories than we first see. People don’t act the way the are for no reason and hence as we get to know people’s stories in a deeper manner we can start to understand the reasoning behind things and perhaps find a little more grace.

One thing I do want to point out is that before this film is a Frozen Short but we did not get to see it on the day of preview, so I am not sure how funny it was. Rumour has it that despite the success of Frozen the not-quite-short film Olaf's Frozen Adventure received serious complaints from moviegoers in Mexico for its longer than usual length, subpar quality compared to the source material and it being a nonstop 20 minute long, Christmas-themed musical number. Complaints were so numerous that the two largest movie theatre chains in the country opted to stop showing the Frozen short film before the movie just a week after opening day. So, it might be a little hit and miss if you get to see it too..

The Verdict
Another great musical smash hit from Disney Pixar and well worth a watch!

The Trailer

The Info
Releases: 26th December 2017
Rating: PG – Contains mild themes
Duration: 127 minutes 
Genre:  Animation, Family
Starring: Anthony Gonzalez, Gael García Bernal, Benjamin Bratt
Director: Lee Unkrich, Adrian Molina

The Extras

When Miguel is walking down the streets at the beginning of the movie, you can spot piñatas of some Pixar characters: Buzz Lightyear, Woody and Mike Wazowski among others

The orchestra conductor who appears towards the end of Coco (2017) is a caricature of the film's composer Michael Giacchino.

In active production between 2011 and 2017, it set the record for being the Pixar animated film with the longest production schedule.