Green Room Reviewed By Clayton Barnett



The Premise
A band straying into a secluded part of the Pacific Northwest stumbles onto a horrific act of violence. Because they are the only witnesses, they become the targets of a terrifying gang of skinheads who want to make sure all the evidence is eliminated.

The Review
I have been hanging out for Green Room after it was released in the States last year with rave reviews for Patrick Stewarts performance as a Neo Nazi leader. But after Anton Yelchin’s recent tragic passing this made for pogniant viewing.

What writer / director Jeremy Saulnier has described as the finale to his “inept protaganist trilogy”, following on from the visceral Blue Ruin and Murder Party, Green Room shows he’s a man in master of his craft.

A tight primal horror-thriller where grisly and sudden twists all come at a real cost, this is gripping viewing. Saulnier gave me one of the best seared-in-my-brain scares I’ve hand for a long time, and of all things one of the most inspiring movie speeches about paintball you’ll ever hear.

The sound design is especially effective, with bloody SFX amping up the fear as you hide behind your hands, and it has the most pratical use of feedback I’ve seen on film. There’s a brilliant ambient electronic score from Blue Ruin composers the Brooke Brothers, accompanied by a rip-snorting punk-rock soundtrack. You’ll have a laugh as the band rip into a cracking cover of The Dead Kennedys’ Nazi Punks, F**k Off.

And Anton Yelchin in one of his final performances? Sad. Sad that such a restless, fierce yougn talent has gone. He’s the heart of this brutal movie and we live and breathe his fear. Green Room also showcases Patrick Stewart’s range as a very different skinheaded leader of young men and Saulnier co-hort Macon Blair makes a welcome return from Blue Ruin.

The Verdict
Excrutiatingly tense, pitch-black funny and scary as hell, this is a hardcore horror-thriller that is all the more enjoyable shared on the big screen on a packed Friday night.

The Trailer

The Info
Releases: Out Now
Rating: R18 – Contains Graphic violence, drug use and offensive language
Duration: 95 minutes 
Genre:  Horror/Thriller
Starring: Patrick Stewart, Anton Yelchin, Imogen Poots, Alia Shawkat, Joe Cole, Callum Turner, Mark Webber, Eric Edelstein
Director: Jeremy Saulnier ('Blue Ruin')

The Extras
Patrick Stewart said in an interview that when he finished reading the script at his country home in England, it was so terrifying that he locked up his house, turned on the security system and poured himself a Scotch. He then knew that he wanted to play the Darcy Banker role because a character that horrifying would be an incredible challenge and make for a compelling film.

During a 2015 Q&A at Fantastic Fest in Austin, TX; Jeremy Saulnier confirmed that while his last two films had colors in the titles- Blue Ruin (2013) and Green Room (2016), he wasn't really working with color as a theme. Rather, Saulnier joked, Green Room was part of his "inept protagonist trilogy" wherein the protagonists are in over their heads and trying to survive using skills they don't really have. This theme is present in both Blue Ruin and Murder Party (2007).


The stance of the machete wielder in the poster references The Clash's "London Calling" album cover with bassist Paul Simonon smashing a guitar.