Amy Film Review

Film Review by Clayton Barnett

The Premise
The story of Amy Winehouse in her own words, featuring unseen archival footage and unheard tracks.


The Review
The makers of sensational Formula 1 doco on Ayrton Senna have hit another one out of the park with this moving and intimate look at the too-short life of jazz-singer Amy Winehouse.


Director Asif Kapadia presents rare and archival footage just like Senna, including a moving tape of a young Amy singing happy birthday. It’s an honest and powerful study of a descent into drug addiction, and the challenges Amy was under from record companies and even her own family. While even painful to watch it’s still hauntingly beautiful.


Swedish actress Noomi Girl With the Dragon Tattoo Rapace is in talks to play Amy Winehouse in an upcoming biopic.


The Verdict
The makers of Senna deliver another riveting watch utilising only archival footage, making for a powerful and tragic tale of a sad self-destructive life.


The Trailer

The Info
Duration: 128 minutes 
Genre:  Documentary
Starring: Amy Winehouse, Mitch Winehouse, Mark Ronson
Director: Asif Kapadia


The Extras

Amy Winehouse's immediate family were initially willing to work with the film's producers and director, having heard about the success of their earlier documentary, Senna (2010). They granted the filmmakers access to hours of archive footage of Amy and her family, as well as giving the filmmakers' their blessing to interview Amy's family and friends. However, they - in particular, Amy's father, Mitch Winehouse - soon began to feel they were being misrepresented in the documentary, that the negative aspects of Amy's life were receiving much more attention than the positive, and that footage had been edited in order to produce an inaccurate narrative of Amy's story, especially the last three years of her life. Mitch Winehouse has said that Amy's fans should consider seeing the film for the rare, previously unseen, archive footage of his daughter, but should pay no attention to the film's general portrayal of her, which he has labeled "preposterous".